"If it can't be grown, it must be mined"

Natural resources are the foundation for our lives and lifestyles.

What would our lives be like without mining? Imagine a world without transportation such as jet planes or railroads, without communications such as cell phones or radar, without decorative items such as art or jewelry, without buildings such as skyscrapers or parking garages, without defense systems items such as missiles or submarines, without medical care items such as X-rays or surgical tools. We wouldn’t have any of these things without mining and minerals.

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Amphibole

Images:

Type: mineral_group

Description:

Amphibolite is a dark, heavy, metamorphic rock composed mostly of the mineral amphibole. Amphibolites have very little to no quartz. “Amphibole” refers not to a single mineral, but to a group of minerals. Most belong to the monoclinic crystal system, but some belong to the orthorhombic crystal system. They are silicate minerals containing SiO4 molecules. The SiO4 groups are connected to each other in double chains.

Mineral Classification: silicates

Chemical Formula:

Double chain SiO4 with other elements

Color: Generally dark black, sometimes brown

Background:

Amphibolite is a dark, heavy, metamorphic rock composed mostly of the mineral amphibole. Amphibolites have very little to no quartz. “Amphibole” refers not to a single mineral, but to a group of minerals. Most belong to the

Sources:

Amphibolite is relatively common. It is found in regions that have been affected by regional metamorphism. Amphibolite is found throughout the Appalachian Mountain chain. For example, significant quantities of amphibolite are found in the Gore Mountain region of the Adirondack Mountains in New York State. They are also found in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on the Tennessee-North Carolina border. Other states along the Appalachian Mountains producing amphibolite are Maine, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and North Carolina.
See also Quartz, stone, and granite